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Parks

Babb's Beach & Lake Congamond

Swimming
Boating 
Fishing
Picnicking

 

Stony Brooke Park
Fishing
Hiking/Walking
Picnicking
Camping with permit
Cross-Country Skiing

 

Sunrise Park
Playground
Swimming
Summer Day Camp
Canoeing/Kayaking
Fishing
Hiking/Walking
Picnicking
Horsehoes
Cross-Country Skiing

Hiking

Lewis Farm Wildlife Sanctuary
Hiking/Walking
Nature Study
Cross-Country Skiing
Located on Hill Street and given to Hartford Audubon Society by Mr. And Mrs. Henry M. Clark. 
Jesse F. Smith Memorial Forest
Hiking/Walkiing
Horseback Riding
Picnicking
Camping with permit
Cross-Country Skiing
Dedicated May 30, 1959 as a memorial to Jesse Fowler Smith - minister, teacher and naturalist. Park closes at dusk.
Hugh M. Alcorn Wildlife Preserve
Hiking/Walking
Located on the east side of Mountain Road, across from Phelps Road. This wooded land was acquired by the Suffield Land Conservancy on December 28, 1983.
 

 

Metacomet Trail
Hiking/Walking

Suffield Section:
A blue-blazed Connecticut Forest & Parks Association (CFPA) Trail, traverses the summit of West Suffield Mountain from the south. The north end was re-routed in 1985 to follow west and north boundaries of Sunrise Park through Suffield Land Conservatory property to the junction of Phelps and Mountain Roads. There are no fires or camping allowed on this trail.

New England Trail:
The trail system consists of two footpaths running in a general north-south direction from the Massachusetts border south to Long Island Sound. The trails were established in the early 1930s by CFPA. At times the trails are discontinuous or travel over paved roads, but for most of their 108-mile length they traverse the dramatic traprock ridges that form the spine of Connecticut’s central landscape. Located on both private and public land, the trails offer some of the finest ridge walking and cliff views in the state. The National Park Service has designated the New England Trail which includes a portion running through Suffield. 
 

 

Rail Trails

Farmington River Canal
A trail system covering over sixty miles generally following the canal built in the 1820's and opening in 1828. This trail runs from Farmington to the Suffield/Southwick border along the now defunct Canal Line Railroad. While some sections have been completed, the trail is still undergoing work in many of the towns along the corridor. In Suffield, the trail project was split into two phases. The first phase, completed in 2000, is the southern section of the trail including the Phelps Road bridge. A .3 mile section, including bridges over Palmer Brook and Mountain Brook, is expected to be completed in the near future. Eventually, once connected to trails in Cheshire and Hamden, bikers/walkers will be able to travel from MA to New Haven. For more information contact the Farmington Valley Trails Council.

Suffield/Windsor Locks Canal Trail
This historic 4.5 mile trail running from Windsor Locks to Suffield, was once used during the 1800's by horses and mules to tow boats along the canal.   The Canal Trail is part of a master plan known as the Windsor Locks Canal State Heritage Park. A civic organization, Friends of the Canal with members from Suffield, Windsor Locks, Enfield, East Windsor and Longmeadow, MA, are committed to improving the canal area. The Canal Trail is open April to October and appeals to nature enthusiasts. 

History:
The Canal Trail was built by hand between 1827 and 1829 by Irish immigrants. It is 5.5 miles long, 80 feet wide, but only 4 ½ feet deep. Three locks were built to accommodate the 30 foot elevation drop along it’s route, as well as an aqueduct to carry the Canal over Stony Brook. The Toe Path, which is the 4.5 mile hiking/biking path today, was used by horses to pull the boat traffic through the Canal. The Canal was built to enable boating traffic to avoid Enfield Falls, a series of rapids along this section of the Connecticut River. After the railroads came along, it functioned as a power source for nearby mills.

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